Need a hand choosing gardening gloves? Here are the best ones we’ve tried

If your current gardening gloves are hanging on by a thread, we’ll help you choose a fresh pair.

Feeling all fingers and thumbs when you’re pottering in the garden? A new pair of gardening gloves might be in order. The best gardening gloves should work as hard as you do. They need to keep your hands clean, thorn free (well, hopefully), and as dry and warm as possible. All while withstanding some of the toughest jobs you undertake at home and maintaining that all-important snug fit.  

If, like us, you’re prone to leaving some less favourable jobs until they can’t wait any longer – removing brambles and stubborn grass poking through paving springs to mind – then it helps if your gardening gloves are comfortable enough to wear for long periods of time.

Gold Leaf Soft Touch Gardening Gloves
Editors Choice

Best overall and best premium purchase

Gold Leaf Soft Touch Gardening Gloves


RRP: £19.91
Who’s this for?
Leather lovers who seek soft and supple gloves offering ample protection against dirt, thorns and even some water. Except for the fiddliest jobs, these are the best all-round gardening gloves, if you don’t mind spending a little more.
Wilko Multipurpose Garden Gloves

Best budget buy

Wilko Multipurpose Garden Gloves


RRP: £2
Who’s this for?
Anyone who wants a decent pair of gardening gloves that can tackle most jobs in the garden and get plenty of change from £5.
Niwaki Gardening Gloves
Recommended

Niwaki Gardening Gloves


RRP: £6
Who’s this for?
If you’ve got a courtyard garden, or an outside space filled with pots, then these gardening gloves are ideal. Though better suited to planting and potting jobs, they’ll still provide decent grip for de-weeding. They don’t show up dirt easily and are super quick to dry when you do wash them, so they’re good low-maintenance gloves.
Pair of Burgon & Ball Love the Glove gardening gloves

Burgon & Ball Love the Glove


RRP: £16.99
Who’s this for?
Though designed for women, anyone with smaller hands who has struggled to remain dexterous in gardening gloves will find these improve grip and help connect you to your garden again.
Spear and Jackson The Kew Gardens Collection Leather Palm Gardening Gloves

Spear and Jackson The Kew Gardens Collection Leather Palm Gardening Gloves


RRP: £11.94
Who’s this for?
Keen to own a pair of lightweight leather gardening gloves without a steep price tag? These gloves are a useful all-rounder pair to own – as long as you don’t mind them never looking fresh again after the first wear.
Wickes Standard Rigger Gloves

Wickes Standard Rigger Gloves


RRP: £2.50
Who’s this for?
People seeking no-nonsense gloves that will offer extensive protection against sharp, tough jobs.You’ll need a large handspan to be able to wear them comfortably, however.
Stihl Function ThermoGrip

Stihl Function ThermoGrip


RRP: £7.30
Who’s this for?
Gardeners craving a snug, secure fit from a thermal pair of gloves that can tackle tough jobs.
Clip Glove General Purpose

Clip Glove General Purpose


RRP: £9.08
Who’s this for?
People with small hands who want a reliable pair of gardening gloves for pottering around in dry conditions.

And no matter how much protection they offer, you need to be able to remain dexterous: using tools safely, handling delicate seedlings and fiddling with awkward locks, for example. No one wants to be continually taking their gloves off every few minutes or having to swap pairs around for different tasks unless absolutely necessary. 

Its a tall order for your gardening gloves to satisfy. There are so many different types of gloves on the market – from sturdy rigger gloves to cosy pairs offering thermal protection. Thats why weve tried a broad selection of branded gloves that can be used for most general gardening jobs, and suit a range of budgets. 

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What we looked for

What our testers looked for

The overall design and general appearance. How well did the gardening gloves fit around the fingers, thumbs, palms and wrists? Were they aesthetically pleasing? 

We compared how easy the gardening gloves were to get on and off (for example, any fiddly wrist straps). The glovescomfort levels were tested over prolonged use during a heatwave, and cold-tested by being submerged in a tub of ice for one minute. We looked at how heavy the gloves were to wear, and did any stitching or material irritate sensitive skin? 

We tested how easily we could open three different styles of locks (keyed padlock, stiff metal bolt and combination lock) when wearing the gloves. We also wore them doing general jobs including repotting, weeding, strimming, and using a trowel and loppers. We also made sure we could turn an outside tap on and off safely while wearing them 

Could we comfortably and confidently grip and pull brambles? We tried with established and young bramble branches to test softer and harder thorns.  

We submerged gloved hands in a deep tray filled with water (enough to cover palms, fingertips and backs) for 30 seconds.  

A variety of stubborn weeds and grasses were pulled out to see if there was any slippage. We also noted how securely the gardening gloves were when lifting pots, watering cans and tools. 

We checked for snagging and general wear and tear after use and washing.  

How easily can the gardening gloves be looked after – and did they crack, dry, smell or fade after a thorough handwash and drying in the sun? 

Gold Leaf Soft Touch Gardening Gloves Overview

Best overall and best premium purchase

Gold Leaf Soft Touch Gardening Gloves

Gold Leaf Soft Touch Gardening Gloves
Editors Choice
Luxury

You could mistake these gardening gloves for something a slick motorcyclist would wear. We let out an audibly satisfied Aaah”, the first time we pulled them on. The deerskin leather is so soft you wonder if its too nice to wear in the garden. Fear not, though, because the bee-yellow palms come into their own when faced with the toughest of jobs.  

Appearance & fit

Comfort

Dexterity

Thorn protection

Waterproofness

Material quality

Ease of care


Who’s this for?

Leather lovers who seek soft and supple gloves offering ample protection against dirt, thorns and even some water. Except for the fiddliest jobs, these are the best all-round gardening gloves, if you don’t mind spending a little more.

Our likes and dislikes

  • Luxurious feel
  • Excellent thorn protection
  • Warm and cool enough when needed
  • Kept water at bay for nearly one minute
  • Easy to get on and off
  • Bulky stitching at fingertips
  • Take a while to dry completely
  • Exterior soft leather shows signs of wear
Wearing the Gold Leaf soft Touch gardening gloves planting heather in a containerCredit: Saga Exceptional

The best gardening gloves we tried

Despite a bit of bulky stitching and extra material at the end of the index finger and thumb (something many of us gardeners with small hands are no doubt used to) the fit is snug and supportive in warm, cold and wet conditions.

Jobs requiring precise dexterity – such as handling seedlings and operating a combination lock – were tricky, but otherwise we could get rid of weeds, grab brambles and use tools with a strong grip. In fact, we were bowled over by the thorn protection. Even the sharpest, thickest bramble thorns could be grabbed slowly without piercing the soft leather.  

There’s no lining, but you don’t feel like you’re missing out as the deerskin is so supple. The company warns that this does mean some dye might rub off your skin, but we didn’t find that in our tests. The vibrant yellow dye did fade after one hand-wash (more so in one glove), which was a shame, though we were impressed at how much muck also disappeared from the luminescent palms and fingers.

If you’re OK for these gloves to never look as pristine as they did when you first put them on, then they’ll become a staple in your gardening kit. 

We liked

How solid these gardening gloves feel. They were comfortable to wear in all temperatures and made us feel confident enough to tackle tough jobs.  

We didn’t like

The thick stitching and fit of index fingers and thumbs were a little distracting from the overall excellent quality of the gloves. And we were surprised at how much dye one glove lost after washing, though the company does warn of some loss.  


Wilko Multipurpose Garden Gloves Overview

Best budget buy

Wilko Multipurpose Garden Gloves

Wilko Multipurpose Garden Gloves
Budget

Wilkos Multipurpose Garden Gloves are the ultimate impulse buy. They’re kind of thing youd chuck in your basket by the tills, and not regret when you get home.  

Appearance & fit

Comfort

Dexterity

Thorn protection

Waterproofness

Grip

Material quality

Ease of care


Who’s this for?

Anyone who wants a decent pair of gardening gloves that can tackle most jobs in the garden and get plenty of change from £5.

Our likes and dislikes

  • Ideal for gardeners on a budget
  • Decent grip
  • Didn’t let much cold in
  • Easy to wash and quick to dry
  • Your hands will smell like the gloves
  • A bit sweaty in the heat
  • Irritating care labels

Expect to pay

RRP: £2
wearing Wilko Multipurpose Garden Gloves de-weeding using a trowelCredit: Saga Exceptional

The best budget gardening gloves

OK, so £2 isn’t going to buy you the best-quality gloves. But that’s the point. This pair do not look like they’re about to fall apart either. And they hold their own in the garden, too. Despite the elasticated cuff rolling up a little, they fit well and are comfortable – if a little sweaty in the heat. 

What stood out to us with these gloves was the grip. The mottled green rubber fingertips temporarily bind to metal in particular, meaning stubborn bolts and outside taps were particularly easy to operate. This also meant that soil clings to the surface – and the gloves do stick to each other a bit – but this is tempered with the ability to grab weeds, grass and tools well.

Thorns, however, pierced right through. We were pleasantly surprised with the protection the gloves offered from the cold, but the same can’t be said for waterproofing, as the cuff and palm backs soaked through instantly.  

These gardening gloves are best worn for short, sharp bursts – I admit I was glad to take them off after wearing them in hot weather, and the rubber smell stayed on my skin for a while after. 

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We liked

When youre only spending £2, theres not much to complain about. These gardening gloves are cheap and cheerful, and offer a pleasing amount of grip and dexterity for the price.  

We didn’t like

The synthetic smell they left on our hands, but thats a minor niggle. 


Niwaki Gardening Gloves Overview

Niwaki Gardening Gloves

Niwaki Gardening Gloves
Recommended
Competitive

The Niwaki Gardening Gloves are a masterclass in Japanese design. Nothing is there that isnt needed. The minimal design is deceptively well-engineered, with abrasion-resistant nitrile fingertips that give impressive grip and feel for the textures of the plants, soil, larger seeds and tools in your hand. 

Appearance & fit

Comfort

Dexterity

Thorn protection

Waterproofness

Grip

Material quality

Ease of care


Who’s this for?

If you’ve got a courtyard garden, or an outside space filled with pots, then these gardening gloves are ideal. Though better suited to planting and potting jobs, they’ll still provide decent grip for de-weeding. They don’t show up dirt easily and are super quick to dry when you do wash them, so they’re good low-maintenance gloves.

Our likes and dislikes

  • You can really feel the task at hand
  • Quick to dry
  • Great for fiddly jobs
  • Surprising amount of water protection
  • No itchy care label or stitching
  • Thorns and sharp plants pierce through
  • A little clammy in the heat
  • No protection from cold
Wearing Niwaki Gardening Gloves potting seedlingsCredit: Saga Exceptional

The best gardening gloves for fiddly jobs

Being able to feel absolutely everything isn’t always a good thing. We found that these gloves’ biggest strength is also their weakness. Thorns, spikes and other nasties will make you wince, so keep these for lightweight, fiddly jobs.

When it comes to how your hands feel when working, sensations are heightened here, too. We found ourselves getting a bit clammy in the heat and felt cold very quickly. Damp jobs aren’t an issue, though, with the gloves offering a surprising amount of protection when faced with water. In our submersion test, it was only in the final few seconds that they gave way and flooded.  

Unlike some of the other gloves we tested, there’s no itchy or unsightly care label (a huge bonus for us) though it did mean taking a quick look at the website to discover they’re hand-wash only. And when they do get wet, drying isn’t an issue. These gloves are so lightweight that they dried on the line in the sun within a couple of hours, and still felt supple. You’ll be back to pottering around in no time. 

We liked

These gardening gloves are the definition of a second skin. If you want to keep your hands clean while repotting, transplanting, watering and tidying – and want to feel as dexterous as possible – then we cant fault them. 

We didn’t like

These gardening gloves arent suitable for tougher, sharper jobs – and wont offer much protection from the cold if youre particularly sensitive to that.  


Burgon & Ball Love the Glove Overview

Burgon & Ball Love the Glove

Pair of Burgon & Ball Love the Glove gardening gloves
Competitive

Light-to-medium gardening jobs like pruning and potting have never looked so good, and thankfully, the gloves stay soft after washing. Just don’t get them wet at any other time 

Appearance & fit

Comfort

Dexterity

Thorn protection

Waterproofness

Grip

Material quality

Ease of care


Who’s this for?

Though designed for women, anyone with smaller hands who has struggled to remain dexterous in gardening gloves will find these improve grip and help connect you to your garden again.

Our likes and dislikes

  • Choice of 11 designs
  • Supportive, padded palm
  • Easy to wash, quick to dry
  • Lightweight, supple material
  • Do not get them wet!
  • Ill-fitting thumb let down the overall snug fit
  • Fiddly strap not ideal for smaller wrists

Expect to pay

RRP: £16.99 £16.99 when bought direct from Burgon & Ball – though the tweed designs are £18.99. We’ve seen them as low as £13.59 in a sale, and as high as £20 elsewhere.
Person wearing Burgon & Ball Love the Glove gardening gloves using loppers to prune bush in the gardenCredit: Exceptional

The best gardening gloves for gifting

With 11 designs available, there’s a pair for every personality (making them ideal for a gift). Immediately, the gloves felt wonderfully soft, inside and out. The stitch detailing on the padded palms (covered with synthetic suede) that followed the natural creases of our hands was a nice touch, especially when you’re expecting a comfortable, snug fit that feels protective.   

A little loop helps to hang them to dry after a wash; the wrist strap enhances the security of the elasticated cuff; and the two-way mesh, synthetic suede and patterned polyester/elastane meet harmoniously with neat, subtle stitching that looked secure.   

We tried out this pair in winter, compared to the other gloves’ summertime testing period. Wearing these gardening gloves on bitingly cold, yet sunny, afternoons – tackling frozen soil – was a mixed experience. Our palms did stay nice and toasty, but our fingers were useless after about 10 minutes each time. These gloves are lightweight, which will work in their favour in warmer weather, but not when you need extra insulation from the elements.    

We liked

The number of designs available (meaning ladiesgloves arent just pink). A secure wrist strap and padded palm meant that dry, light-to-medium duty garden tasks were a pleasure.  

We didn’t like

Lack of thorn protection and zero water resistance are its Achilles heel, but at no point does Burgon & Ball claim otherwise. The snug fit was let down by the fact I could still pinch around 1.5cm of loose fabric at the top of each thumb.  
 
Read our Burgon & Ball Love the Glove review 


Spear and Jackson The Kew Gardens Collection Leather Palm Gardening Gloves Overview

Spear and Jackson The Kew Gardens Collection Leather Palm Gardening Gloves

Spear and Jackson The Kew Gardens Collection Leather Palm Gardening Gloves
Competitive

Spear and Jackson’s The Kew Gardens Collection of gardening gloves features items designed specifically for all sorts or purposes – from seeding and weeding to thermallined rigger-style gloves for heavy work. We tried the unlined leather gloves, which are a bestseller from the collection – and it’s easy to see why. 

Appearance & fit

Comfort

Dexterity

Thorn protection

Waterproofness

Grip

Material quality

Ease of care


Who’s this for?

Keen to own a pair of lightweight leather gardening gloves without a steep price tag? These gloves are a useful all-rounder pair to own – as long as you don’t mind them never looking fresh again after the first wear.

Our likes and dislikes

  • Affordable leather gloves
  • Pleasing amount of thorn protection
  • Comfortable to wear in warm and cold weather
  • Lightweight yet tough
  • Index finger stitching made us sore
  • Creamy white leather only pristine once
  • Not at all waterproof
Wearing Spear and Jackson The Kew Gardens Collection Leather Palm Gardening Gloves to pull out weedsCredit: Saga Exceptional

The best deceptively tough gardening gloves

These gloves are a safe pair of hands in the garden, easily taking on many tasks some of the other gloves in the wider collection have been specifically designed for. We could securely grip and pull weeds, handle tools and potter about happily. They offered ample protection from the cold in our ice test, and though they felt hot wearing them outside in the sun, our hands weren’t as clammy as expected when we took them off. (Just don’t get them wet – they let in water immediately, and the material clung to our hands, making them tricky to remove.)  

Fresh from the packet, they’re strikingly smart. Though we did wonder why the marshmallow-white hue was chosen for the palms. As you might suspect, these gloves are pristine only once. Generally, they fitted our small hands well – though the absence of lining meant the thick stitching where the leather meets the green spandex in the fingertips made our index finger a bit sore after prolonged use. As with any glove featuring a Velcro strap, we had to be careful not to snag the softer material.  

The tag suggested heading to the website for cleaning tips, but we struggled to find any. We went with the only information provided on the tag, which was to avoid putting them in a washing machine. After a thorough hand wash, we found these gloves took a while to dry in the sun and were still very wet after two hours hanging on the line. Once dry, the leather had lost its initial suppleness inside and out – especially at the fingertips. 

We liked

Even though these gloves are lightweight, they can navigate tough, thorny tasks without immediately showing signs of wear and tear, only discolouration 

We didn’t like

That they didn’t stay pristine – although anyone who buys white gardening gloves, only to be disappointed when they get dirty, should perhaps know better. We also hoped they would provide a better barrier against water, too.  


Wickes Standard Rigger Gloves Overview

Wickes Standard Rigger Gloves

Wickes Standard Rigger Gloves
Budget

Rigger gloves are, by definition, not general-purpose gardening gloves. But for less than £3, Wickes’ offering pulls some heavyweight punches for the price – and we’d always make sure a pair was in our garden shed, primed for the toughest of jobs.  

Appearance & fit

Comfort

Dexterity

Thorn protection

Waterproofness

Grip

Material quality

Ease of care


Who’s this for?

People seeking no-nonsense gloves that will offer extensive protection against sharp, tough jobs.You’ll need a large handspan to be able to wear them comfortably, however.

Our likes and dislikes

  • Their ‘rough and ready’ charm
  • Outstanding level of thorn protection
  • Wear and tear doesn’t show after heavy use
  • Really affordable
  • Do not fit smaller hands
  • Minimal dexterity
  • No washing advice provided

Expect to pay

RRP: £2.50
Pulling brambles out wearing Wickes Standard Rigger GlovesCredit: Saga Exceptional

The best gardening gloves for tough jobs

Being one size (and the label saying ‘Men’s’), these shabby chic gloves were never going to be a good fit on small female hands. The digits, palms and cuffs swamped us, though across the knuckles there’s a thicker lining that anchors the gloves into your grip. So, despite not being able pick up a key or handle delicate plants due to next-to-zero dexterity, the gloves didn’t fall off once when we undertook the tougher jobs (like bramble clearing) – and did them with ease. For added comfort, there’s a single patch of soft lining loosely stitched into the inner palms, which confused us at first, but meant the tough chrome leather didn’t chafe or cause blisters – even in hot weather.   

The upside of using gloves that don’t look pristine to begin with is that they age subtly. Aside from stiffening of the leather at the fingertips and stubborn stains, the gloves maintained a steady quality after washing. There were no washing or care instructions provided. Sadly, we did notice a small tear in one of the palms after a few uses, during their first wash. 

We liked

These gloves are charmingly shabby chic from the outset, and their thick chrome leather construction offers reliable protection.  

We didn’t like

Being one size meant that they barely stayed on our small hands, and they might be too rough and readyfor those seeking a more comfortable glove.  


Stihl Function ThermoGrip Overview

Stihl Function ThermoGrip

Stihl Function ThermoGrip
Competitive

Stihl’s bright orange gardening gloves will be easy to spot even in a dimlylit shed. And you’ll be glad when they’re safely in your grip. These thermal gloves offered one of the best fits we tried, with no internal stitching to make our fingertips uncomfortable or cuff that rolls up.

Appearance & fit

Comfort

Dexterity

Thorn protection

Waterproofness

Grip

Material quality

Ease of care


Who’s this for?

Gardeners craving a snug, secure fit from a thermal pair of gloves that can tackle tough jobs.

Our likes and dislikes

  • Comfortable fit
  • Really warm, but not too sweaty
  • Bright colour easy to spot
  • Affordable for the quality
  • Soft fleece material
  • Not water- or thorn-proof
  • Unsuitable for fiddly jobs
  • Info leaflet too in depth
Wearing Stihl Function ThermoGrip gardening gloves while strimming the gardenCredit: Saga Exceptional

The best gardening gloves for cold hands

 

These gloves are, of course, designed for heavy work in cold, wet and snowy conditions. As expected, we found their warmth useful in cold conditions, but what we didn’t expect was this this warmth would stay with our hands after taking them off. Excellent news if you struggle with cold hands and troublesome circulation.  

We assumed that our ability to easily work different locks and tools – and grip strong weeds with ease – would mean that these thick gloves would also grant dexterity for fiddlier jobs. Sadly, this wasn’t the case. We tried to transplant some wildflower seedlings and had to take them off to avoid obliterating the poor plants. The same mottled latex found on the Wilko gloves plays the same role here, but we found it a lot less ‘sticky’. 

When we went to wash the gloves, the thick instruction booklet they came informed us that the symbols on the back of each glove explained both how to wash them, and some specs (such as whether they were waterproof and how cut-resistant they are).

Though each symbol has been designed to convey lots of specific info in succinct way, we found them difficult to decipher. We eventually followed the booklet’s care advice in the absence of a corresponding symbol. We found these gloves easy to hand-wash with some soap and water, and were able to wring them out and dry easily considering the thick thermal material. 

We liked

These gloves are a hug for your hands. They withstand cold temperatures, yet also remain comfortable to wear in hot weather too. Wearing these, youll be able to spend longer in the garden than usual in the winter. 

We didn’t like

We hoped theyd provide a better barrier to thorns, and we had to take them off to be able to transplant seedlings – which would undo all their hard work keeping our hands warm on colder days.  


Clip Glove General Purpose Overview

Clip Glove General Purpose

Clip Glove General Purpose
Competitive

These are lightweight, breathable gloves, with a pale blue mesh around each finger. This gave excellent breathability in warm weather, but of course meant cold and wet conditions become your sworn enemy. Grip-wise, we didn’t struggle at all to pull out tough weeds, and even found the gloves gave some thorn protection. However, this was unpredictable, with the odd thorn piercing through – an unwelcome surprise 

Appearance & fit

Comfort

Dexterity

Thorn protection

Waterproofness

Grip

Material quality

Ease of care


Who’s this for?

People with small hands who want a reliable pair of gardening gloves for pottering around in dry conditions.

Our likes and dislikes

  • Handy carabiner for hanging
  • Snug fit for small hands
  • Some smaller thorn protection
  • Really breathable
  • Not suitable in wet conditions
  • Differences in between quality of materials
  • Big logo on strap felt cumbersome
Wearing Clip Glove General Purpose gloves unlocking a padlockCredit: Saga Exceptional

The best gardening gloves for small hands

Though the colour isn’t our favourite choice (we think they’re a little anaemic), the carabiner clip to hold these gardening gloves together could have been useful if it hadn’t broken so easily (more on that later). We found it didn’t get in the way of tasks too much if you kept it attached, though when paired with the large rubbery logo on the Velcro strap of each glove, they can begin to feel slightly cumbersome. The hanging loop is useful to pull the gloves off with, as they were a snug fit.

As with all the designs we tested where multiple materials meet around the fingertips, the stitching added some bulk and caused a bit of difficulty with very fiddly tasks (like opening a combination lock). But otherwise, we could feel the edges of plant pots and completed tasks with ease. 

The synthetic material of the gloves was pleasingly durable, and nice and light to wash, much like the Burgon & Ball palms, and didn’t snag or stiffen. The mesh, however, showed signs of wear, with fibrous fuzz appearing after a couple of uses. We also developed two sore patches on our middle fingers from pulling tough weeds out and using a trowel while wearing these gloves. Sadly, the carabiner mechanism wasn’t robust at all and broke the first time we attached the gloves to the line with it to dry after handwashing. 

We liked

Being able to keep them together with the clip, which is these gardening glovesnamesake. The fit was one of the best of the stitched togethergloves we tried. 

We didn’t like

Knowing the gloves dont offer consistent protection against thorns and damp conditions. 

Gardening gloves buying tips

Still need help choosing your gardening gloves?

If you’re still unsure about which type of gardening glove is right for you, we can help. We spoke to gardening expert Dan Cooper to see how he chooses his own gloves, from deciding on a material to knowing how much to spend.

Which material is best?

There are so many types and styles of gardening gloves – each made from different natural and synthetic materials. You may need to avoid latex if you have an allergy, or you might prefer to leave leather behind and not use animal-based products.  

Knowing which material is best for gardening gloves really depends on what you’ll be using them for. 

“It’s leather all the way for me,” says Cooper. “Like other materials, there are different grades and qualities. A thinner, lightweight leather combined with some stretchy nylon and Lycra offers durability and flexibility for general jobs. A thicker, full-grain leather provides better protection against thorns and sharp stones. However, it’s not indestructible.  

“Safety gloves made from multiple layers of leather and artificial fibres should be worn when using powered cutting equipment, such as hedge trimmers or chain saws.” 

If you need waterproof gloves, then Cooper suggests popping on a pair of rubber ones.  

“They’re perfectly acceptable for some gardening tasks, but they will no longer be waterproof if they are punctured,” he says. “Your hands will sweat inside, so don’t wear them for long periods or if you have a latex allergy.” 

How should gardening gloves fit?

If you’re buying gardening gloves online, there’s always a risk they might not fit perfectly on your first attempt. But it’s good to know what you should look for when you try a pair on for the first time.   

“The ideal gardening glove will feel like a second skin: snug and close fitting, but not tight or restrictive,” says Cooper. “You should easily be able to form a fist and flatten your hand back out again. If it feels as if you are wearing boxing gloves or there’s excess material at your fingertips, try a different glove.  

“Also, pay attention to how a glove fits at the wrist. Ideally, there should be no space for dirt or debris to fall inside. Look out for knitted or elasticated cuffs that will hug your wrists.” 

Is it worth splashing out on high-end gardening gloves?

With such a huge range of gardening gloves available, knowing whether to splash out or stick to a value-driven budget can be tricky. 

“While you will get what you pay for, how much you should spend is more about what you intend to do wearing the gloves,” advises Cooper. “An inexpensive pair of nitrile-coated gloves will be perfectly adequate, comfortable and even space-saving if you’re an occasional gardener who prefers to be outside in fine weather.  

“If you’re tackling a garden clearance project, shifting paving slabs or pruning thorny shrubs, you should pay a little more and get gloves that offer superior levels of protection.” 

These will cost more, but it’s important that your hands are protected. 

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Rosanna Spence

Written by Rosanna Spence she/her

Updated:

Rosanna Spence has been a journalist for nearly 10 years, reporting on a huge array of topics – from microwaves to cocktails, sustainable buildings, the Caribbean islands and beyond. She’s interviewed chefs at the helm of Michelin-starred restaurants and chatted to countless CEOs about their businesses, as well as created travel guides for experienced travellers seeking life-changing adventures. Throughout her career, she has created content for Business Traveller, i-escape.com, Pub & Bar, BRITA, Dine Out and many more leading titles and brands.

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