Xiaomi Mi Body Composition Scale 2 review

Aggressively priced smart scales offering plenty of body composition metrics

Recommended
Budget
Check price

The Mi Body Composition Scale 2 from Chinese brand Xiaomi is a stylish set of smart scales offering an awful lot at a bargain price. Xiaomi may not be the best-known brand, but it has been quietly producing affordable gadgets such as smartwatches, fitness trackers and smartphones for years.  

At first glance, the scales look pretty unremarkable, and if you didn’t know better, you’d be forgiven for thinking that these scales do nothing more than measure your weight. But if you make use of the Zepp Life app, you’ll quickly realise that, like many of the best smart scales, these offer a comprehensive set of measurements to give you all sorts of information about your body composition and general health. 

Originally released back in 2020, this set of scales promised a lot, offering 13 different measurements to assess your overall health. But while they offer plenty, the readings aren’t always the most accurate, and the app isn’t the most insightful. That being said, there’s little that competes at this price point. The scales could well be a useful (and inexpensive) addition to your health and fitness routine. 

Xiaomi Mi body composition scale 2 reviewCredit: Exceptional
Recommended

Mi Body Composition Scale 2

Budget

With measurements of 13 different metrics, the Mi Body Composition Scale 2 offers comprehensive body composition scales at a competitive price. And while that wallet-friendly price point does mean there are compromises to be made, there’s still plenty to like about these smart scales.  

Design

Features

Performance

Value


Who’s this for?

Anybody who wants body composition analysis without spending a lot of money. If you already wear a Xiaomi fitness band or smartwatch, these will be even more appealing, as they’ll complete the fitness insights you are already getting in one app.

Our likes and dislikes

  • Measures several body composition metrics
  • Excellent value for money
  • Balance test may be useful for some
  • Lack of wi-fi means the app must be open to sync data
  • Questionable accuracy of some body composition metrics
  • Limited additional information from the app

Expect to pay

RRP: £29.99 These have an RRP of £29.99. For those willing to wait, we have seen these become available during sale periods for less than £20.

Mi Body Composition Scale 2 Review method

How we tested

We conducted regular weigh-ins using these scales, routinely testing them under similar conditions at the same time each day. Alongside these scales, we were able to use the Withings Body Scan scales, and the QardioBase X scales, to give us a couple of other devices against which to compare the measurements, and check accuracy and consistency. 

We also made regular use of the Zepp Life app, which the scales pair with, to see how well the data captured by the scales is transferred and displayed, and what other support and insights it offers.  

Slightly confusingly, Xiaomi also sells a Mi Smart Scale 2, which doesn’t offer all the body composition metrics. We tested the Mi Body Composition Scale 2, the more advanced of the two smart scales. 

Mi Body Composition Scale 2 Setup

Quick and easy

set up screens for the Xiaomi Mi body composition scale 2Credit: Exceptional

As with most of the smart scales we’ve tested, setting these up was simple. You need to download the Zepp Life app (formerly known as Mi Fit) and create an account. You’ll need to supply details such as your date of birth, sex and height so the scales can calculate your body composition.  

Once you’ve got the app ready, turn the scales on and connect them to the app via Bluetooth. You’ll need to have the app open to record any readings, and the scales themselves will only display your weight, rather than the rest of the body composition metrics they measure.  

When you’re ready to use these scales, simply step onto them. Your weight will be displayed almost immediately, although you’ll then need to go into the app to see all your other metrics. This has pros and cons – the main benefit being that you don’t need to stay on the scales as they display each of 13 different measurements. The drawback, of course, is that you need to remember to have your phone with you to make sure the data is being transferred successfully.  

Mi Body Composition Scale 2 Design

Available in any colour, as long as it’s white

The Xiaomi Mi Body Composition Scale 2 next to a pair of yellow trainersCredit: Exceptional

There’s a lot to like about the design of the Xiaomi Mi Body Composition Scale 2. While most scales come in black (occasionally with a white variant available) these are exclusively available in white. The benefit is that white hides dust and fingerprints far more effectively than black. The top is the usual tempered glass, while the display is almost invisible until the scales switch on. When it does come on, the bright white LEDs are clear and easy to read. 

The scales are a smart design: slim, relatively light and stable. Unlike other scales that tipped as we stepped onto them, these didn’t appear to wobble. They look and feel considerably more premium than their price tag suggests. 

Like many other body composition scales, these use bioelectrical impedance analysis to estimate body composition. This involves sending a small electrical current through your body, and measuring the resistance it meets. While this is safe for most users, if you have a pacemaker, or other implanted device, we’d recommend that you consult your doctor before using them.  

Mi Body Composition Scale 2 Performance

A few questionable readings

We’ve discussed this in more depth in our guide to smart scales, but when it comes to performance, consistency is arguably more important than accuracy. While we don’t want to see readings that are wildly inaccurate, small variations probably won’t matter for most people. If the measurements are consistent with themselves, then the trends they reveal are likely to a true reflection of any changes in your body composition. 

When we tested these scales, we found that weight readings were generally in line with previous measurements (allowing for day-to-day fluctuations). Weight readings were almost always the same as those on the QardioBase X scales, and usually about 200g (7oz) higher than the readings on the Withings Body Scan. These are small differences, so we’re happy that these scales are recording weight that seems to be in the right ballpark. 

Body composition readings, however, were vastly different. Typically, body fat readings were coming in around 3% higher than the QardioBase X scales, and as much as 8 or 9% higher than the readings we were getting from the Withings Body Scan scales. Visceral fat readings were also showing as much higher than with the other two scales. 

Again, the variations were relatively consistent, so if you were to see a drop in your body fat percentages over time, we’d suggest that this would be a true reflection of changes in your body. But the differences are significant, and if the scales substantially overestimate your body fat percentage, then it could cause problems. For instance, if your body fat were reported as, say, 20%, when it’s actually 12%, and you set a target of reducing it to 15% percent according to these scales, the actual target you might be working towards for your body fat could be as low as 7% – a level that is potentially unhealthy. 

There were other inconsistencies within the app, too. Examples included visceral fat readings being recorded as “high”, while the QardioBase X and Withings Body Scan both put them at “optimal” and “healthy”, respectively.  

While we can’t be certain, we suspect that the Mi 2 scales are overestimating fat readings, given that two other devices are both showing lower readings on a consistent basis. 

Nonetheless, we feel that the scales are consistent enough to be of use to people in trying to achieve their goals. 

Mi Body Composition Scale 2 Features

Plenty of metrics, some more useful than others

A close up of the Mi logo on the Mi2 body composition scalesCredit: Exceptional

The volume of metrics that these scales record is impressive. They measure a wide range of different body composition metrics, such as, 

  • weight  
  • BMI (body mass index), – a calculation that uses your height and weight to estimate whether you fall into a “healthy” weight range or not.  
  • body fat percentage  
  • muscle mass  
  • moisture rate, described as body water percentage by other smart scales manufacturers  
  • protein rate, shown as a percentage, which estimates how much of your body mass consists of protein. 
  • visceral fat rating  
  • basal metabolic rate, which is the number of calories your body needs to function. 
  • bone mass  
  • physical age, an estimate of how your body has aged, compared to your chronological age. 
  • ideal weight  
  • body type, wherby the scales will place you in one of nine categories, based on your body fat and muscle mass ratios 
  • health score, shown on the app as a “Body score” between zero and 100, which is calculated based on the analysis of your height, body fat, body water, muscles and ‘other’ data 
  • balance test. 

While this is an impressive list at first glance, some metrics are undoubtedly more valuable to the average person than others. We’re particularly pleased to see visceral fat measured by these scales. Visceral fat is the so-called “hidden fat” that wraps itself around your internal organs. High levels of visceral fat are associated with certain health risks, such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and Alzheimer’s disease.  

Visceral fat is not something that BMI alone can identify. Certain ethnic groups can still be at increased risk of developing some health conditions, even when people from these groups have what is typically classed as a “healthy” BMI. So, measuring visceral fat specifically can be potentially more valuable than just using BMI.  

Some of the other metrics don’t seem so valuable. It’s unclear why the scales are measuring your protein levels, and the app doesn’t really explain the benefit either. The body score also seems slightly flimsy as a metric, as while it offers a snapshot of your overall health, the app doesn’t do much to explain what this is, or why it matters.  

You are given a score out of 100, and a label of “poor”, “good”, or “excellent”. This seems less helpful than the more detailed breakdown of your body composition, which can show how and where you might be doing well or otherwise.  

screenshots of the balance test on the Mi 2 body composition scalesCredit: Exceptional

Balance

The balance test is an interesting addition that we haven’t seen on other smart scales we’ve tested. You step onto the centre of the scales, stand on one leg and close your eyes. You then keep your balance for as long as possible. The app supplies a rating based on how long you managed to keep your balance.  

Better balance means you are less likely to fall. The NHS estimates that one in three adults over 65 will fall at least once a year, so we can see how this test may be useful. Once again though, the app doesn’t offer much to explain why balance matters or what you can do to improve your score. It’s also worth mentioning that you could perform the same test without the scales.  

The body type metric is another area we felt needed more consideration. It places you in one of nine categories, such as “balanced”, “skinny”, “lacks exercise” or “thick set”. Again, it’s simplistic, and at worst, could potentially put people off if they feel demotivated by the description. The app doesn’t add any additional insight or context for this either. 

Zepp Life app

The app is simple and clearly designed to integrate step, sleep and heart rate data from other Xiaomi devices. The homepage provides a snapshot of your weight and your body score (plus a balance score if you’ve used this feature). Tapping on the weight or body score will open windows that give you extra information, such as your “ideal weight”, how you compare with other users of the same height and age, or the other metrics the scales measure. The graphs are clear and easy to understand and will allow you to easily track changes over time. 

The more detailed breakdown of your body composition shows you how you are doing on each of the metrics being measured. Data is presented clearly, with a simple colour-coded line to denote where you sit, with ranges described with terms such as “low”, “normal” or “high”. Each metric also has a short description attached. Some (but not all) give information about what the measurement is, and a brief sentence to explain what you might try to do to improve your scores. 

We didn’t feel these were always very insightful. For example, our visceral fat was measured in the “normal” range, but the text said it was too high. Our protein level was classed as “good”, but the text said we had “eaten too much protein”. At best, this is confusing. At worst, it could lead to someone to taking steps that could be counter-productive to achieving their goals. 

It isn’t the best app we’ve tested, and compared to the best apps, we felt this one was lacking in terms of presentation and insights. The graphs are clear enough, but the advice and support is thin, and not especially insightful. 

Battery

The battery compartment on the Mi body composition scale 2Credit: Exceptional

The Mi Body Composition Scale 2 uses four AAA batteries, which Xiaomi claims will last for up to 12 months. Most smart scales that we’ve tested that use disposable batteries also offer battery life somewhere between six and 12 months, so these are in the same ballpark as other devices. Battery life will inevitably be influenced by how often the scales are used. 

Mi Body Composition Scale 2 Value

Ultra-competitive

In value terms, it’s hard to fault these scales. They offer an extremely comprehensive set of measurements, including the likes of body fat percentage, visceral fat, and muscle mass, as well as a few more unusual metrics, which you may not need.  

They look very smart, and combined with all those health metrics, it’s seriously impressive to see them at such a low price point. There are many smart scales costing significantly more that don’t offer anything over and above what these do – look at the likes of the Fitbit Aria Air (RRP £49.99) and the Garmin Index S2 (RRP £129.99) for examples.  

They aren’t perfect. The sales are perhaps slightly on the small side, and the app isn’t great. But then again, for the price, you can’t necessarily expect the same level of polish as for a more premium device.  

But in terms of what you get for the money, it’s hard to argue that there is anything out there currently offering better value.  

Mi Body Composition Scale 2 Also consider

Competition

If you don’t think these Xiaomi smart scales are for you, then here are a couple of alternatives to consider: 

Eufy P2 Pro

Eufy P2 Pro smart scalesCredit: Exceptional

The Eufy P2 Pro smart scales (RRP 59.99) offer a lot of the same body composition metrics as the Mi 2 scales, but in a slightly smaller chassis. Important metrics such as body fat percentage, visceral fat, and muscle mass, are all included. The app is similarly user friendly, and the scales have wi-fi, which means you won’t need to open the app to record your weight measurements. They are small though, so people whose feet are above a size 9.5 may find them less comfortable to use. 

Withings Body Cardio

Withings Body Cardio scale on a wooden floor next to a snake plantCredit: Withings

For a higher price, the Withings Body Cardio scales (RRP £149.95) offer a premium experience, with some added health metrics that you don’t see from other manufacturers. They don’t offer as many health metrics, with visceral fat being a notable omission. But they do offer metrics that focus heavily on heart health, measuring pulse wave velocity and vascular age. The Health Mate app is also excellent, being easy to use and providing more advice and context about the readings your scales are giving you. In our view, these supply more valuable insights than some of the metrics on the Xiaomi Mi 2 scales. They are significantly more expensive though. 

Mi Body Composition Scale 2 Final verdict

Cheap and very cheerful

For anyone interested in getting a comprehensive suite of body composition metrics without spending a fortune, the Xiaomi Mi Body Composition Scale 2 is about as good as you’re going to get. They look much more expensive than the price tag suggests, and you can get plenty of useful information from the app. 

There are compromises to be had: the app isn’t the best, the data doesn’t appear to be the most accurate, and lack of useful insights is a little disappointing. There’s also the fact that they use disposable rather than rechargeable batteries. Finally, the absence of wi-fi does make the scales more fiddly to use than those with a wi-fi connection. For the price point, though, these are compromises that we feel are probably to be expected. 

In absolute terms, there are better smart scales out there. But as a value for money proposition, these compete with devices that are considerably more expensive, and could be an excellent starting point for anyone trying smart scales for the first time.  

Buy this if:

  • You want body composition metrics for the lowest price possible. 
  • You already own other Xiaomi products that connect to the Zepp Life app. 
  • You’re new to body composition and want to test the waters. 

Don’t buy this if:

  • You want the most accurate measurements available. 
  • You’re looking for useful added insights from the app to help you reach your goals. 
  • You don’t want to have to remember to open the app before weighing yourself. 
Recommended

Mi Body Composition Scale 2

Budget

With measurements of 13 different metrics, the Mi Body Composition Scale 2 offers comprehensive body composition scales at a competitive price. And while that wallet-friendly price point does mean there are compromises to be made, there’s still plenty to like about these smart scales.  

Design

Good looking, solid and feel more expensive than they are.

Features

Lots of body composition metrics, plus an interesting balance test.

Performance

Does everything you’d expect, but the app lacks a bit of polish and depth.

Value

Very inexpensive given the range of features on offer.


Who’s this for?

Anybody who wants body composition analysis without spending a lot of money. If you already wear a Xiaomi fitness band or smartwatch, these will be even more appealing, as they’ll complete the fitness insights you are already getting in one app.

Our likes and dislikes

  • Measures several body composition metrics
  • Excellent value for money
  • Balance test may be useful for some
  • Lack of wi-fi means the app must be open to sync data
  • Questionable accuracy of some body composition metrics
  • Limited additional information from the app

Expect to pay

RRP: £29.99 These have an RRP of £29.99. For those willing to wait, we have seen these become available during sale periods for less than £20.

Mi Body Composition Scale 2 Specs

Weight 1.7 kg
Dimensions 300 x 300 x 25
Battery life Up to 12 months
Bluetooth Yes
Wi-Fi No
Weight limit 150 kg
Measurements recorded Weight, BMI, body fat percentage, muscle mass, moisture rate, protein rate, visceral fat rating, basal metabolic rate, bone mass, physical age, ideal weight, body type, health score, balance test
Number of users supported 16
Steven Shaw

Written by Steven Shaw he/him

Updated:

Steven is a Staff Writer for Fitness at Saga Exceptional, primarily focusing on fitness tech, and how we can use technology to help us achieve our fitness goals. Prior to joining the team at Saga, Steven was a freelance writer for a variety of outlets, most notably TechRadar.

His degree in Medieval History prepared him less adequately for his career than you might expect, but the years spent working in technology focused retail were much more helpful.

Outside of work, Steven is passionate about health and fitness, and particularly enjoys high-intensity interval training, weight training, and increasingly, spending time recovering. Steven loves reading, films and a wide variety of sports. A particular highlight was watching Viv Richards and Sachin Tendulkar batting together in an exhibition match.

He wishes he could travel more. He can also tell you a lot about the Anglo-Saxons, Vikings, and Carolingians. Most of his non-work time is spent with his young children, who are the living embodiment of high-intensity training.

  • Email